Between Two Thieves

 

 

I cannot believe how long it has been since I have posted on my blog.  As well, how the thought of “two thieves” continues to incubate in my heart.  Is it a book, an insight to be shared or a message that I should continue to ponder privately?  I alluded to it once on a post but have never wrestled through it sufficient for it to leave my spirit.

 

Processing is how I spend a large majority of my time.  Probably secondary to that is reading the Scriptures, and the writings of others regarding that mysterious text.

 

Then of course the rest of my time is giving to living according to where my heart seems to be that day, as I move out into the workplace and among my family.  My family, such a gift and yet robbed it seems of so much life experience, having watched me wrestle between two thieves most of my life.

 

By now you must have had some idea of where the thought comes from?

 

“Two other men were also led out with Jesus to be killed. Both of them had broken the law. The soldiers brought them to the place called the Skull. There they nailed Jesus to the cross. He hung between the two criminals. One was on his right and one was on his left.  Jesus said, “Father, forgive them. They don’t know what they are doing.” The soldiers divided up his clothes by casting lots.

 

The people stood there watching. The rulers even made fun of Jesus. They said, “He saved others. Let him save himself if he is God’s Messiah, the Chosen One.”

 

The soldiers also came up and poked fun at him. They offered him wine vinegar. They said, “If you are the king of the Jews, save yourself.”

 

A written sign had been placed above him. It read,

this is the king of the jews.

One of the criminals hanging there made fun of Jesus. He said, “Aren’t you the Messiah? Save yourself! Save us!”

 

But the other criminal scolded him. “Don’t you have any respect for God?” he said. “Remember, you are under the same sentence of death. 41 We are being punished fairly. We are getting just what our actions call for. But this man hasn’t done anything wrong.”

 

Then he said, “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.”

Luke 23:32-42 (NIRV):

 

I must however give credit where credit is due, for my first “aha!” occurred in a sanctuary on a Sunday morning as my good friend Allan Wright of Reynolda Presbyterian unpacked his own revelation about the conversation that occurred between three men, two guilty, while one suffered with a cause that drew both blasphemy from one and repentance from the other.

 

 

Then there is Richard Rohr, to some a heretic and to others a man of tremendous insight into the gospel, with little middle ground allowed!  “The image of the cross was to change humanity, not a necessary transaction to change God—as if God needed changing! Duns Scotus concluded that Jesus’ death was not a “penal substitution” but a divine epiphany for all to see. Jesus was pure gift. The idea of gift is much more transformative than necessity, payment, or transaction. It shows that God is not violent, but loving. It is we who are violent.”

 

It would seem that the lowly birth and tragic though prophetic, death of Jesus was God saying “flag on the field” to religion and the religious; His death, an answer to the punishment sin’s guilt demanded of the sinner, rather than a means of assuaging God’s wrath!  My concern is that even with the great scriptural contrast between who Jesus demonstrated God to be, alongside the wrathful One described in the Old Testament, we have preferred some combination of the two and devised doctrines to support that perception!

 

The mystery of scripture is not in the literal text but in its ability to capture the hearts of both man and God in a way such that an ongoing revelation is possible and probable to the one whose heart is open.

 

“Jesus was killed on the collision of cross-purposes, conflicting interests, and half-truths. The cross was the price Jesus paid for living in a “mixed” world that was both human and divine, simultaneously broken and utterly whole. He hung between a good thief and a bad thief, between heaven and earth, inside of both humanity and divinity, a male body with a feminine soul, utterly whole and yet utterly disfigured—all the primary opposites.” – Rohr 7/26/17

 

Today we set inside a nation so divided that our global image of hope and the American Dream becomes more tarnished almost daily.

 

At a recent conference represented by 10 nations, I was privileged to engage in a an elevator conversation with a first generation immigrant Venture Capitalist. He was very clear about his role in aiding those pouring into our country with ideas and dreams such that they are able to get “legs under their dream” as soon as possible, thus prepared for what he saw coming to this country.  This was a brief conversation as we descended 19 floors, but as he was leaving, in a very cold but caring way, as he sensed my desire to see our country transformed, he left me with these words: “250 years is not bad for a country, you guys have had a good run!”  I was dumbfounded by his calculated realism!

 

What brought us here?  Perhaps our willingness to accommodate division as a Church, Catholic-Protestant, Charismatic-Orthodox traditional; or maybe it was by design; left brained-right brained?  Could that have been the necessity of the Trinity Concept, three in one or three that are contained in a fourth, just now being dealt with in our both and conversations of the last 10-120 years?

 

Again I found it interesting in Rohr’s timing as he used the same words in a recent morning meditation: “the crucified one” always hangs between these two thieves — paying the price within himself just as we must do.”  For context I will include his entire paragraph:

 

“If we must have perfection to be happy with ourselves, we have only two choices. We can either blind ourselves to our own evil (and deny the weeds) or we can give up in discouragement (and deny the wheat). But if we put aside perfection and face the tension of having both, then we can hear the good news with open hearts. It takes uncommon humility to carry the dark side of things. It takes a kind of courage to carry the good side, too. Archetypically, “the crucified one” always hangs between these two thieves — paying the price within himself just as we must do. (See Luke 23:32–34; note Jesus forgives both thieves.)”

 

Our political divide, even though today it seems potentially insurmountable, is one of the healthy traits of democracy, as long as civility reigns and ego’s are contained; as well, the ability to separate personal agenda from prophetic calling, and religion from divine relationship.

 

The challenge of living and dying between two thieves is quite tedious and in a pluralistic society spiritual cannibalism also comes into play.

 

So much to unpack!

A Fourth Man

These last couple of weeks has been quite involved at several levels, within my business, my community engagement and also my family.  April 6th is a special time given that my daughter, Summer, and now her daughter, Caroline, were both born on that same date!

 

Yet amidst all that, I have continued to wonder about a thought that occurs to me as I continue to meditate upon the concept of the Trinity.  You may be humored by the thought that I put into my walk with Christ, but for me, Christianity is not about religion, church attendance nor even sharing my testimony, but rather, fully understanding who God is and affording avenue for the Trinity to flow through me.  If that happens, the other stuff will be a natural!

 

Is there more to the Trinity story than simply three beings, unlike me, whose only mission is to lavish love upon each other, and to demonstrate that love by way of this broken creation, of which I am a part!  Was there entry made for me to walk through this life, bathed in that same love, in full communion with this Tri-part Being?  That is the Gospel!

 

Raised quite simple, I was taught to see God the Father as Creator and a kind of general overseer of the Universe; then Jesus, His Son, a Redeemer type foreordained to rescue a broken world.  It was all about us and a God feverishly attempting to redeem something that had gone awry.  Once redeemed, one could by way of the Third Person of the Trinity, the Holy Spirit, be empowered to win the rest of the world to Jesus, if each so chose.  The concept was fairly easily explained.

 

Only of late, through the insistent work of Richard Rohr have I begun to think differently about the Trinity and even Creation.  Who are these three beings, surely not like we who are “lower than the angels?”  Apparently, there is some pecking order in the heavens of which we are the least.  In fact, “Franciscan theology on the whole . . . emphasized the incarnation as the love of God made visible in the world. [Bonaventure] did not consider the incarnation foremost as a remedy for sin but the primacy of love and the completion of creation. He recapitulated an idea present in the Greek fathers of the church, namely, Christ is the redeeming and fulfilling center of the universe. Christ does not save us from creation; rather, Christ is the reason for creation. . . . Christ is first in God’s intention to love; love is the reason for creation.” 1

 

Was Creation solely about the Christ, a manifestation of unadulterated love in front of fallen angels, rather than some attempt on God’s part to establish a Universe, only to have it be overpowered by a Fallen Angel, thus requiring His rescue?   Really, and worse yet, was the fallen-ness of these creatures a great source of anger, even rage from Father God, requiring the blood of His Son as the only sufficient means to appease that anger?   If so, how does this contrast with the loving nature of Christ, whom we claim to be the manifestation of God in the flesh, let alone the Prodigal whom Jesus spoke of, “his father saw him, and had compassion, and ran, and fell on his neck!”

If I may turn a corner here as we head toward my point, one of my favorite stories in the Bible is that of the three Hebrew children, children of the king’s seed, sought out by Nebuchadnezzar for their academic prowess.  Yet, when they refused the diet recommended, let alone later on, to bow down to the King, things got a little rough!

 

Actually there were four Hebrews, to include Daniel.  It seems that after Daniel’s interpretation of the King’s dream, all four were elevated in authority within the province but apparently Daniel served in a different station than the other three.  I say this because it appears that Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego found themselves isolated in some way from Daniel and ended up facing the fiery furnace.

 

Most if not all, know the story of the King ramping up the furnace so hot, that it actually slew the men who threw the three Hebrews in!

 

However, in the midst of the fire, a FOURTH appeared and by the King’s own admission, that was likened unto a “son of the gods!”

 

This is a quantum leap from Sunday School, but is there a message here for the believer willing to step into the fire of this great transformational shift occurring in today’s world?   Is there a place for a fourth in the Trinity by way of the Holy Spirit, so invincible that even the flames of this great cultural shift cannot harm us?  We walk around in the fire while not even the hint of smoke attaches itself to us?

 

My point this morning, has less to do with the commitment of these young boys, than the faithful companionship that drew God into their fire, appropriating such an invincible nature by way of this fourth man.  Surely there is a compounded message beyond the fact that these three boys were saved, or even elevated once more by this fickle King?

 

Was the Son of God actually modeling a walk that is now possible for mankind?  Was it this mystical relationship which afforded the Hebrew heroes of the faith, along with the martyrs of the gospel since, to endure extreme hardship?  Is there a place in the Trinity for a fourth, the Bride of Christ, and could this afford such an invincible walk that even in the fire of this present cultural shirt, we are not burned.   Was there a Trinity message for us in that fire?

 

Have we accepted a lesser message in our brokenness, believing this whole thing is about us, rather than some greater drama being played out the lesser stage of this small globe; and yes, before an audience of spiritual beings much more powerful than ourselves.  Is that message about the empowerment of love?

 

This by the way, at least in my eyes, now justifies the shed blood of Christ, for I can now envision a Tri-part Being who is so forgiving and all knowing that even before we fallen creatures were made, it was foreordained that He would show up in our fire.  Even at a time when crucifixion was the highest penalty for breaking the law, knowing that our sin, not His wrath, would bring such guilt as to demand blood sacrifice, the highest cost to mortals, the shedding of blood, His blood!  This penalty, even the blood of a lamb, mysteriously reinforced in religion, would culminate in a moment like no other, communicating what true love is…for God is love!

 

[1] Ilia Delio, Christ in Evolution (Orbis Books: 2008), 6.

Getting to NO

 

I was unable to escape a pastor’s message on Sunday regarding the great “NO” faced by our Lord in Gethsemane, a place more and more significant to my life.

 

Luke records these words of Jesus in the Garden: “Father, if you are willing, take this cup from me; yet not my will, but yours be done.”1

 

In a “Getting to Yes2 World” or perhaps now as recommended by our new President, learning the Art of The Deal3, we find ourselves as a nation, far removed from the humility and the love demonstrated by the man Christ Jesus.

 

Yes, this God became flesh, knowing the agony of the cross, choosing to fully reveal His great love at a time when this cruel art of execution was used by the Romans; meant to discourage any insurrection or tendency toward crime.  Ironically, the crime committed by those responsible for the death of Christ perhaps far exceeds that of the criminals that died on each side of the Christ!  UHMM, even as I write, I sense perhaps a tinge of bitterness still resides in my own heart, for even after Calvary, it is not “God’s will that any should perish, but that ALL should have eternal life.”4   WOW, what love!

 

Gethsemane was Jesus, both God and Man getting to “NO”; coming to agreement with Himself as God, and coming to a comfort level as a man with God’s full purpose for His life.

 

In this case there is greater mystery as to how the decision was made. “God chose him as your ransom long before the world began, but he has now revealed him to you in these last days.”5

 

Calvary was seen by the religious as a rightful punishment for someone claiming to be God, though He had repeatedly manifest miracles attributable only to God; by others, an act of appeasement to a God angry at His sinful Creation!  Perhaps with God, it was seen as the only act of love that we as sinful people would find fitting, thus relieving us of the guilt that our brokenness loads upon our lives?  He himself would become flesh; a scape goat bearing our sins in the manner fitting of only the worst of sinners!

 

Getting to this “NO” was still no easy negotiation for the God-Man, yet humility and love won over through “great sweat drops of blood.”

 

For those equally “called according to His purposes” our prayer’s answer may not always be “Yes”, or even “Not Now!”  “But rejoice inasmuch as you participate in the sufferings of Christ, so that you may be overjoyed when his glory is revealed.”6

 

 

 

1 Luke 22:42 NIV

2 Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In

by Bruce Patton, William Ury, Roger Fisher.

3 The Art of the Deal, Donald Trump.

4 II Peter 3:9

5 I Peter 1:20 NLT

6 I Peter 4:13 NIV

Religion and Love

I guess, with the political clamor in our nation and in fact around the globe, and the divisive religious conversations now occurring, yes even on Facebook, I tend to read scripture differently than ever before.  I saw a Facebook post this a.m. that read “Muslims Need Jesus, get equipped.”  Not sure what will be offered but I trust it is an exercise in loving those that come from quite a different experience than the majority of Americans.

 

Only true love, not hate or fear affords the conversational openness to share the transformation that occurs when one truly comes to know Christ.

 

This morning as I read from Philippians, though a friend recently cautioned me about seeing Jesus through Paul, I noticed how much his perspective had changed as he aged.

 

Credibility for me comes when I consider the radical change that occurred in this man, who once boasted of those imprisoned and even killed Christians on behalf of God, though well-schooled in his Theology.  Yet, here in Philippians, he refers to his former peers still in Judaism as “mutilators of the flesh” when referencing circumcision.   What was the radical change that occurred in Paul’s life?  BTW, it was post-ascension, which gives me hope of escaping religion as well.

 

The entire Biblical narrative, both Old and New Testaments seems packed with ongoing revelation as the people of God mature generationally, though not without struggle.  This killing in the name of God seems to be one of the last bastions of sin to fall, fostered by an “us and them” perspective that so many religious people seem to feed upon.

 

Jesus, who professed to be God in the flesh said, “come unto me all that are heavy laden and I will give you rest”…not power, prosperity nor a mandate to kill, but peace and a radical concern for others!

 

As I read further, even into John’s writings, this seasoned disciple who spent time with Christ, also reflects a new perspective now near ninety years of age.  Timne and a relationship with God seem to be releasing the old religious bias that caused so much turmoil over the actual city of Jerusalem as the place where God would eventually reign, thus validating Israel as the chosen of God.  Now perhaps more non-religious than ever before, he writes, “Then I saw ‘a new heaven and a new earth,’ for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away, and there was no longer any sea.”  Something new was in his spirit.

 

As I age, I have to wonder at the mystery of scripture, and how mankind, even those most in love with God, have captured so much of their own bias, while still miraculously delivering such a powerful and ongoing revelation of the Father!

 

Apparently there is more to come than any one religion has yet to phantom from this loving God, whose desire it is that none perish!  I guess age causes one to wonder more than in the former days when youth convinced us that we knew it all!

Not Even a Wayfaring Fool!

 

rublevs-the-trinity

Here I sit, once more struggling with transparency, as with wonder, I reenter my annual read through of the Word!  Now endowed with almost seven decades of life and forty plus years of scripture reads, I still find challenges as I sort through the filters of numerous pastors, a plethora of books and my rich life experiences!

 

What is the life learning, if any, that I will leave to those behind me?

 

I had not traveled far into this year’s read before I was dumbstruck!  Hearing as it seemed for the first time, the deep agony in the voice of the Creator as he begs of a fallen Adam, “Who told you that you were naked?”

 

For some of my readers, this text no longer merits literal, biographical evidence of the plight of the first two human beings on earth. However you unpack scripture, my point is, the alignment of these stories with my own personal journey is to revealing to disregard.

 

In God’s comments to Adam, I hear the pain of a friend, even closer a father, who knows that something dreadfully unnecessary has happened to the one He loves.  I have to think about a moment I shared with my Dad, the morning I revealed to him that my first marriage had just taken an irreconcilable hit!  He took me to his own bedroom, the place so personal to him and my mom, almost sanctuary-like when entered as a child.  He knew his 22 year old son was having one of those naked moments that life hands us all, and all too often!

 

The need for this post began several days ago, and until now I have said little about it. Yet, this morning as I moved on through the story of Abraham, I heard this same paternal dialogue repeated in the story of the testing on Mt. Moriah.  Tradition attributes the writing of Genesis to Moses.  From his point of view, this was a test of loyalty to a God that demanded sacrifices.  I have to believe that in some way sin creates that demand, while our Creator weeps at times, though somehow sovereignly separated from full intervention?  Still yet, through the Canon of Scripture, God has mysteriously and miraculously revealed His true nature in these stories recorded by broken men and women.

 

The story of Abraham is amazingly parallel with so many of us.  We set out to fulfill the “calling of God” with hearts laden with promises, that at some point in time will seem impossible.  Abraham like so many still devises means by which to accomplish these promises, all of which only compound his challenges. Abraham was well-intended in his decision to raise his nephew Lot after his brother Haran dies; ingenious in his attempts to protect his beautiful wife Sara when King Abimelech came around; not to speak of his stellar agreement to take Hagar as surrogate for the sake of offspring and certainly courageous in his commitment to offer his only son on Moriah!

 

“Then God said, ‘Take your son, your only son, whom you love–Isaac–and go to the region of Moriah. Sacrifice him there as a burnt offering on a mountain I will show you.’”1 Perhaps his failed attempts at “serving God” had brought him to the point that such a request seemed reasonable?  Many a radical, yes even in our day, has made this same mistake in the name of religion.

 

Let’s circle back to the words of this compassionate God in the garden, “Who told you that you were naked.”  Something had so tarnished the conscience of Creation, that a redemptive journey would be necessary, such that “wayfaring men, though fools, shall not err therein.”2 The beloved Peter, and later John the Revelator, hints that God foreknew what would happen, even before Creation was birthed on this very globe, to which as the story goes, Satan had been banished.  “He was chosen before the creation of the world, but was revealed in these last times for your sake.”3   It causes one to wonder if the real drama is not occurring in the heavens, while those who chose to participate, though they suffer violence at times, are well guarded actors in some plot that proves the power of love!

 

So here we sit, naked, striving to please a God who two centuries ago showed up with His Gospel of Love!.  His response to the most sinful was “Go and sin no more” and to the most religious, “you vile hypocrites!”

 

I’ll leave this post with a couple simple question: Was Moriah simply one more story, as God further unpacks His counter to the demands of sin ?  Daily, he takes the heavy pile of dead wood, our works destroyed, and places them on the shoulders of His only Son, the Ram, caught in the thicket of our madness.

 

Was Moriah a test of Abraham’s loyalty?  Moses called it that.  The irony is that when the true sacrifice showed up in the only Son of God, unlike Abraham who recognized the Ram, we knowingly followed through with a crucifixion!

 

His response to our sin: a resurrection!  Selah!

 

1 Genesis 22:2 NIV

2 Isaiah 35:8 KJV

3 I Pet 1:20 NLT

New Life and True Intimacy

Snow CabinI trust this next Manger Moment will be of benefit not only to those inquiring of faith, but those long into their journey, yet still young at heart.   I would encourage reading the previous post for the sake of context.  My objective over these next few days is to process the observations of my journey, now some 44 years.

 

As my wife and I were discussion just yesterday, everyone has a faith journey and a story needing to be told, but unfortunately few write it down.  Writing is laborious, personal and to some threatening.  Transparency assumes that one has something to say.  The older I become, the deeper into community I participate, the more I realize that.

 

From early childhood, my life has been surrounded by people with true spiritual expectations.  Literalists in their interpretation of scripture, their “by the Book” lifestyles seemed to afford numerous God Moments.  Apart from the institutional constraints of an early Pentecostal movement, spiritual freedom, miraculous intervention and yes, even prosperity, blessings beyond their skill set was a way of life for these hard working Great Depression survivors!

 

My personality type limited personal righteousness more than I would now desire, but I have certainly known an abundance of grace.  Paraphrasing the Apostle Paul, “God forbid that one sin knowing that grace abounds, but where sin abounds, grace does much more abound.”

 

Can I get a witness!

 

For me this is not just some religious promise, but a reality so profoundly experienced that I can offer a date, Jan 3, 1973.  No preacher was present to bring a heightened emotion, followed by an altar call, though I respect the fact that so many have entered the Kingdom in just such a moment.  For me, church was not a place I frequented.  Rather, it was a late evening visit to my Dad’s house, a Divine appointment that allowed me to walk in on his prayers, my name personally a part of his asks of God!

 

Sober at the time, as I had so grown to respect this dear man, though still doubtful of his consistent though compassionate religious bent.  In my arrogance I walked up behind his kneeled frame, laid my hand on this shoulder, fully prepared to tell him I was fine and that he needed to “get a life”!  Touching him was a life changer, I can feel it as I write; my body was suddenly overwhelmed by a presence other than his. I stood dumb struck by that living room couch!

 

“God if you are out there and you can change my life, I will give it to you.”  Words I shall forever remember.  Suddenly, a voice spoke with clarity, one immediately recognized from my childhood: “If you will confess your sins with your mouth and believe in your heart that Christ died for you, you can be saved.”  I had no clue that I would find that exact statement later on, once my now decades romance with a leather bound book began!  My earnest response, “I think that is what I am doing, I must be saved.”

 

My life changed radically, my friends either scattered or inquired of this new found hope.  My career as an educator took on new meaning.  I now knew a peace that passed understanding.  I knew a power that could bring remedy to the pity of those still trapped in my former life of lust, lies and limitations.  Peace, power and pity generated a humble passion!

 

Little did I know the marvelous and at times perilous journey that lay before me?  Back “home” at last, with even the errors of my past working for my good!
To be continued.

A Manger Moment

220px-the_velveteen_rabbit_pg_1This morning in the Secret Place (that Holy moment when one truly senses a nearness beyond religious discipline) the teacher in me was reawakened.  Perhaps I simply recognized the Teacher.

Life experience is the tool of the Teacher; capturing what the Teacher says is the skill that daily begs of me and thus the joy of writing.

First, and usually too early in the morning, I sense a profound honesty, a transparency that by grace, reaches beyond my own inadequacies and historical demonstration of darkness; there seems a spiritual tension, a reality that truth remains yet to be unpacked.

Life is felt once more!

That Life was instilled in me as a child.  When I do not know, but knowing has always been a part of my being.  I do know that God loves me and sharing that love is my greatness contribution to this globe.  When I share the love of God, when I know that a life has been truly touched by the Christ in me, the joy of that moment far surpasses any role played heretofore!

At the risk of losing the more religious of my readers, Skin Horse, in Margery Williams’ The Velveteen Rabbit calls it becoming real!   …once you are Real you can’t become unreal again. It lasts for always.

How do I know that I am loved, only because I love others!  The Apostle John said it this way, “… everyone who loves the Father loves his children as well.” I Jn 5:1 NIRV.

This verse, read again this a.m., has always been precious to me.  You see, within a year or two after I had my life changing moment with God, January 3, 1973, I had been invited back into the church.  Perhaps too rapidly, I was introduced to the challenges of congregational leadership.   I awoke one Sunday morning with questions as to this new and developing vocation.   Was this something God was doing or merely a new venture?  At that time, my heart was still tender, given the remedy that grace had offered me some few months before.

My question of the Father that morning: “how will I know going forward that this is real?”  “Are you doing what you are doing out of love for others?” was the reply!  My answer was a resounding, yes!  I recall the relief as I finished shaving and began dressing that Sunday morning.

Now 44 years into this journey, the challenge is the same: am I doing this out of love, and do I truly love others above self?  That in a nutshell is the Gospel, the love of the Father, as demonstrated in the Christ, the Word made flesh.

This morning I revisited that place, reexamining that Love.  I’ll call it a manger moment!

Too lengthy for a morning post; perhaps I’ll make an attempt at a series:

New Life and True Intimacy-A Personal Companionship with “Christ Alone”

The Veil– When the Cares of Life Distract Me

The Curtain of Separation– The Fabric of My Distance

Religion– Self Justification of that Distance

Philosophy– The Rationale for My Distance

Politics– Herding vs. Hurting

The Place of Separation – The Consequence

The Crisis – Love Again Revealed

“There was once a velveteen rabbit, and in the beginning he was really splendid. He was fat and bunchy, as a rabbit should be; his coat was spotted brown and white, he had real thread whiskers, and his ears were lined with pink sateen. On Christmas morning, when he sat wedged in the top of the Boy’s stocking, with a sprig of holly between his paws, the effect was charming.” 1

To be continued.

1 The Velveteen Rabbit, HOW TOYS BECOME REAL by Margery Williams, Illustrations by William Nicholson, Doubleday and Company., Garden City, New York.